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Furry Art Night--

I guess three people showed up for furry art night last night. I got some job stuff done and then joined the table--actually got some poetry written, two poems (only one of which I'm proud of, but, meh). Checking my journal, I note that the last time I wrote a poem was the end of September, 2006. That's a pretty piss-poor track record! So, furry art night, definately a good thing for my dried-up tidepool of inspiration.

Comments

( 9 comments — Leave a comment )
furrybluenaki
Apr. 2nd, 2008 04:09 pm (UTC)
Yeah, when I write poems I find they come to me within a few minutes. Some of my good ones took like 5-10 mins to write. Then I have lately lost some motivation, and want to focus more on drawing. I just wish I didn't have so many responsibilities because they take time away from what I really want to do.

I really wish I could have made it, but I have class on Tuesday nites, and it's a little far to make it there. If I do get time I can do the work from my own home.

Edited at 2008-04-02 04:10 pm (UTC)
spottylogic
Apr. 2nd, 2008 04:27 pm (UTC)
I *think* it usually takes me an hour to write a medium-length poem, and then usually another hour to refine it if I was going to do anything with it (I keep telling myself that this is the year I'll actually submit something). It really depends a lot on how rigorous I am with the formal aspects of a poem. Even a poem that's "free verse"--or at least doesn't concentrate on a rigid adherance to rhyme or meter--really needs to draw on internal rhymes and assonance, and contain rhythmic elements, IMO.

At its heart--and I know some "slam"-style poets would disagree with me on this--poetry is the most refined form of writing--refined like premium gas or pure sugar, not refined like "drink from the teacup with pinkie extended." Formalism is one of the big pendelums in poetry. Pure free-verse developed as a reaction to poets using rigid poetic forms (say, sonnets, rhymed iambic couplets, &ct) as a crutch. Right now, I think we're still on the "free verse" swing of the pendelum, a lot of magazines won't even accept rhymed verse (!) because it's viewed as immature, too "easy" (amateur poets viewing rhymes as the only important element of a poem). I've argued that "free verse" is as big a crutch, it liberates people from the need to edit, refine, hone their craft. But then, I've been told by other people that I'm a formalist. I told them they were poopie-heads. To each their opinion.

The thing that takes the longest for me lately is finding an idea :( But that's really a matter of finding/making the time to sit down with paper and write something, writer's block is really a gentle way of saying "too lazy/too busy," at least in my case.

furrybluenaki
Apr. 2nd, 2008 06:05 pm (UTC)
I hadn't really thought about there being a difference between letting inspiration flow and doing some edits along the way, and doing major revisions to a poem.

Like the one at the link below, I just let it flow without hardly any editing. I had to post a link because LJ seems to strip out all tabs and indenting spaces. I wrote this for a friend about a couple weeks ago.

http://www.cnetworksllc.com/extras/den_mother.txt
spottylogic
Apr. 2nd, 2008 06:17 pm (UTC)
There's an HTML tag that will let you get away with that--it's called "PRE". Here's the effects of the PRE tag:
you
   can
      space
     things
   pretty
  easily.


To activate it, use (shift-comma lessthan)PRE(shift-period greaterthan), type however you want, then (shift-comma lessthan)/PRE(shift-period greaterthan).


I guess the important question is, who's the audience of the poem? If poetry is your thoughts and reflections, a form of journaling, then stream of consciousness is great for preserving the moment of the inspiration (and not editing it will let you hold onto more of it before it vanishes, like Coleridge's "Xanadu" that he forgot while writing!) If you view poetry as a product for distribution, then honing it to perfection becomes a vital part of the poetic process.

On the other paw, many people view the naturalness of a stream-of-consciousness style as being exciting and energizing and refreshing. I go back and forth on this, for me, the formal elements are vital to my process and the product I want to create. There's a hewge school of poetry that strongly emphasizes the immediacy and the moment (most slam poetry is very breathy and free). Depends on your needs and your audience. And if you were trying to submit your poetry for publication, there are magazines for either mindset.
furrybluenaki
Apr. 3rd, 2008 01:16 pm (UTC)
Ah, now I get it:

<PRE>
you
   can
      space
     things
   pretty
  easily.
</PRE>


Edited at 2008-04-03 01:44 pm (UTC)
spottylogic
Apr. 3rd, 2008 01:55 pm (UTC)
Yep, it also changes the font to "monotype" so that every letter is the same width. "Pre" stands for "preformatted", at least in HTML.
furrybluenaki
Apr. 3rd, 2008 03:10 pm (UTC)
I hadn't known that you could do HTML in the comments section.

Edited at 2008-04-03 03:11 pm (UTC)
spottylogic
Apr. 3rd, 2008 03:21 pm (UTC)
I hadn't known you could edit comments. How are you doing that?
furrybluenaki
Apr. 3rd, 2008 03:46 pm (UTC)
Hmm, it seems once someone responds to your comment I can't further edit. But there's a little pencil icon beside the x delete and the pin when I first post one.
( 9 comments — Leave a comment )

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